• newsheader

Give addicts heroin on the NHS to stop gangs profiting from drugs, says top police officer

A senior police officer has called for an end to criminalising drug addicts, warning that the UK has "comprehensively failed" to win the war on drugs. Mike Barton, Durham's Chief Constable, said that using the NHS, or a similar institution, to supply addicts with drugs would stop the flow of billions of pounds to organised crime gangs.

Read article

Ketamine: Living in dreams, managing the realities

Ketamine is often perceived as a novelty drug which seems to have emerged out of nowhere with a catastrophic set of health and social consequences. Instead of repeating the mistake of further criminalising its users, the Government is urged to take a more enlightened approach to the growing ketamine crisis.

Read article

Desperation breeds disaster: The ugly truth about Krokodil

It's easy to focus on the sensational aspects of the emerging krokodil "flesh-rotting drug" story, but that ignores the most troubling issues around its origins, its popularity and its continued use. Krokodil is the street term for a home-made injectable opioid called desomorphine, a drug with effects similar to, but not as long lasting, as heroin. Desomorphine was first patented in the U.S. in 1932, but the homemade version has risen in popularity in Russia in recent years.

Read article

UK urges gyms to provide needles for steroid users

Gyms should provide needles for people who inject steroids and tanning drugs to reduce the risk of them contracting blood-borne viruses such as hepatitis and HIV, British health authorities said Tuesday. They also urged needle and syringe programmes normally targeted at heroin users to look at how to reach out to people who inject dermal fillers such as collagen or Botox.

Read article

Prescribing Heroin to Save Lives

We should consider the benefits of physician-supervised, prescription pharmaceutical heroin maintenance programs. Also called HAT (heroin assisted treatment) and HMT (heroin maintenance treatment), this treatment has been working for a number of years in places like Switzerland and Germany.

Read article

HIV, HCV, and drug use in men who have sex with men

The report by Tony Kirby and Michelle Thornber-Dunwell uncovers an emerging and troubling public health and community issue. The intersection of unprotected sex and use of street and party drugs is likely to amplify the transmission of HIV, hepatitis C virus (HCV), and sexually transmitted infections (STI) in men who have sex with men (MSM). 

Read article

Giving Drug Addicts Free Clean Needles Is Worth Every Penny

The value of clean needle exchanges is settled science. Public health bodies ranging from the American Medical Association to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, to President George H.W. Bush's and President Bill Clinton's surgeon general, have endorsed providing injection drug users with the opportunity to anonymously exchange dirty needles for clean ones. Doing so decreases the spread of HIV and hepatitis, without creating new drug users.

Read article

Insite survives 10 years on

Studies published in various medical journals including the Lancet and the New England Journal of Medicine concluded Insite saves lives and health care dollars, reduces disease transmission and does not increase crime or perpetuate active drug use.
Additionally, a recent Vancouver Coastal Health report revealed Downtown Eastside residents, a portion of whom are addicts, are living longer — from a life expectancy of 69.4 years in 1996 to 79.9 in 2012.

Read article

The Case For Drug Consumption Rooms in the UK

DCRs are officially sanctioned healthcare facilities, where people can use pre-obtained drugs under the supervision of trained staff, in a hygienic, safe and non-judgmental environment. They are operated primarily for people with a history of problem drug use, dependency and addiction. Most DCRs are physically integrated with other services for people who use drugs, typically providing needle and syringe exchange, drug treatment, advice on safer drug use, general healthcare, counselling and social support.

Read article