• newsheader

See how legal highs are tested at the Wedinos Project

Wales has become the first part of the UK to run a government-funded drug testing service that's open to the public. The Wedinos project, run by Public Health Wales, was set up to tackle the increase in new psychoactive substances, better known as legal highs.

Read article

Denmark's drug consumption rooms: A proven success in first year

Denmark has joined a handful of other countries worldwide in providing “fix rooms,” or drug consumption centers (DCR’s) where users are supervised when using. The Danish Parliament passed legislation in June 2012 that would allow municipalities to open these centers and Copenhagen launched the first one in October of that year. Two other Danish cities have since followed suit.

Read article

Experts warn of rise in gay ‘slamming’

Three times as many gay and bisexual men in London inject drugs than in England as a whole, according to new analysis, which also found that four times as many use crystal meth in the capital than across the rest of the country.

Read article

The need for prison needle exchange programs

Even though harm reduction and risk prevention programs exist in other jurisdictions, many Canadian prison guards insist against these programs. Guards state that the clean needles distributed to inmates could be used as weapons. However, this argument disregards the fact that in countries that have needle distribution programs, there have been no incidents of these needles being as weapons against guards.

Read article

Legal highs: UK to opt out of new EU regulation regime

Britain already has a tougher approach than much of the rest of Europe to synthetic psychoactive drugs such as Benzo Fury, NBOMe and Mephedrone. The home secretary can issue a temporary banning order, which makes it illegal to supply but not possess the new substance for 12 months while the Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs investigates how harmful it is and whether the ban should be made permanent.

Read article

Why does providing crack pipes to people who smoke crack matter?

Although the continued establishment of programs like needle exchange and supervised injection sites is a sign that harm reduction principles are increasingly accepted, not all is fair and equal in the world of harm reduction. People who smoke crack cocaine, for example, are not accorded the same public health measures – like being given safer drug use equipment – as people who inject their drugs. One of the more controversial harm reduction programs recently implemented in just a few cities in Canada is the distribution of pipes to people who smoke crack.

Read article

Baltimore wants to give out thousands more needles to drug users

Since 1994, city Health Department vans that work with addicts have traded clean syringes for used ones in a one-for-one exchange, currently distributing 50,000 needles a year. City officials say that system hasn't stopped enough heroin addicts from sharing or reusing needles and spreading disease.

Read article

Open Market

How easy is it to have any drug you want delivered to your door with no questions asked? This and other issues raised at HIT’s Hot Topics conference gave a revealing snapshot of changes in the drugs field, as Max Daly reports.

Read article

Why "Just Say No" doesn't work

“Just say no.” In 1982 First Lady Nancy Reagan uttered those three words in response to a schoolgirl who wanted to know what she should say if someone offered her drugs. The first lady's suggestion soon became the clarion call for the adolescent drug prevention movement in the 1980s and beyond. Since then, schools around the country have instituted programs designed to discourage alcohol and drug use among youth—most of them targeting older elementary schoolchildren and a few addressing adolescents.

Read article