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Heroin kills thousands of people every year. Here’s a controversial solution that could change that

It’s a method that has had success in other parts of the world, but is untested in the United States. The idea is to prevent fatal overdoses by providing supervised injection sites where addicts can use the illegal narcotic under the watch of medical professionals. Then, if they start to overdose, workers can administer naloxone to reverse the process. The addicts would also receive services and counseling to help them kick addiction.

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Mother, who lost son to heroin, wants all drugs legalised

Rose Humphreys says she believes her children would still be alive today if drugs were not in the hands of street dealers, but the Government says it wouldn't put an end to drug deaths.

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Home Office drug strategy: Time to refresh or rethink?

The new five-year strategy has been written with hardly any public discussion at all. You won't find any details on the Home Office website. Nothing. It is almost as though the department doesn't want to consider alternative options...

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Rehabs' Failure to Give Lifesaving Naloxone to Vulnerable Clients Is Unacceptable

Although data is lacking, experts' observations and anecdotal evidence overwhelmingly suggest that only a tiny minority of treatment facilities currently provide overdose education - including preventing, recognizing and responding to an overdose and the risks of mixing certain substances - or offer naloxone.

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HIV support services face closure as councils withdraw funding

Vital HIV prevention and support services are facing closure after being earmarked for cuts by local authorities across the country, leaving potentially thousands of people with the virus cut adrift at the very time the transmission rate is increasing.

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Are safe injection facilities for heroin users a step in the right direction?

A safe injection site that opened in Vancouver in 2003 sees up to 1,000 visitors a day. And extensive research suggests the intervention is working: According to a study by the British Columbia Center for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, there was a 35 percent reduction in heroin overdose deaths in the neighborhood surrounding the site from 2001 to 2005. It has also demonstrated positive impact on infectious disease transmission and quality of life in the neighborhood.

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Boston's Heroin Users Will Soon Get A Safer Place To Be High

Addiction treatment providers in the area have had hushed conversations for many months about creating a safe place where heroin users could get high. At least eight countries around the world have some sort of supervised injection facilities, monitored by nurses, where patients can both use drugs and rest or sleep off the effects.

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Liz Evans And InSite’s Insightful Story

Liz is the co-founder of InSite and has worked in the area harm reduction for over 20 years. InSite, which opened in 2003 and is based in Vancouver, Canada, is North America’s first legal medically supervised injection centre.

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Ithaca's Plan To Open A Safe Site For Heroin Users Faces Legal Hurdles

If Mayor Svante Myrick wants the injection site to see the light of day, there are major legal hurdles he's going to have to surmount, says Leo Beletsky, a professor of law and health sciences at Northeastern University in Boston. The facility needs some kind of authorization or exemption from the state of New York, either by changing state law or as an executive action from the governor. Then Ithaca will need similar exemption at the federal level.

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